Lucky wedding traditions around the world

By Kineta Booker

If there’s one thing Hollywood has taught us, smashing plates at a Greek wedding is tradition. But what about the rest of the world?

The team at 888Poker has pulled together a list of 21 lucky traditions which include broom jumping, bell breaking, and running away.

Let’s start close to home. In Australia, some couples opt for the Unity Bowl. Each member of the bride and groom’s families are given a coloured stone which is unique to them. During the ceremony they each place the stone in a bowl which is then displayed at the couple’s home, symbolising how the families have coloured the couple’s life, and to remind the newlyweds of their families.

Some other traditions include:

  • Did you know that in Kenya the father of the bride spits on her head and chest to bring good luck to the bride
  • In an African-American wedding, the bride and groom jump over a broom at the end of the ceremony. Whoever jumps the highest is the decision maker in the household
  • Following a wedding in the Philippines, the couple release two white doves – symbolising a loving and successful marriage
  • The groom’s mother in Guatemala breaks a white ceramic bell filled with grains when the couple arrives, symbolising a prosperous marriage
  • A bell is also used in the Irish culture. It is rung after reciting the vows. The chime is said to ward off evil spirits
  • In the Korean culture, carved, wooden ducks or geese are thrown at the bride by her mother-in-law. If she catches one she will have a boy. If she doesn’t she will have a girl
  • Imagine running away during your wedding reception. That’s exactly what couples do in Venezuela. It’s good luck if they make it away without getting caught, and also good luck for anyone at the reception who realises they’re missing
  • Baumstamm Sägen is a wood-cutting ritual in Germany. The couple cut a piece of wood with a two-handled saw, symbolising the first obstacle they’ll get through as a married couple
  • In Japan, the couple, along with their parents, take part in a sake-sharing ceremony. They each take three sips from three cups. This formalises the bond between the families
  • Joota Chupai is a wedding tradition in India. The eldest unmarried girls from the bride’s family steal the groom’s shoes while his family try to get them back, usually through ransom. No one knows why they do this but it’s fun and gets everyone involved

Surprisingly, New Zealand has been missed from the research which means that we can start our own traditions. It’s more fun and creative that way!